Canada Aviation And Space Museum, Ottawa

Going somewhere spontaneously is far more exciting then planning out a trip for a few weeks or months.  There is just something about packing up the car and just going.

Friday morning, I said, “Let’s go to Ottawa, take in a few museums, go see the musical ride and stay a few days.”  And that is what we did.

The last time we visited the museums in Ottawa, my daughter was far to young to really appreciate them.  Now that she is a bit older, I wanted to take her to a few museums as a little summer treat.

One of the museums that she wanted to re-visit, was the aviation museum, which is kind of in the middle of nowhere.  However, i was not going to complain, since we would be indoors and not outside in the 36 degree Celsius heat.

If you pay attention to the arrangement of the aircraft in the museum, you will notice that the museum is leading you along in the evolution of flight & aircraft in Canada (Keep in mind that the majority of aircraft displayed in the museum, are of military origin).

Below is the Bleriot XI (re-production), the aircraft used by Louis Bleriot to cross the English Channel on July 25th, 1909.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is the Curtiss JN-4 “Canuck”, which was used as a trainer during WWI.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Nieuport 12 hanging from the ceiling.  This is a fighter, reconnaissance and trainer aircraft that was used by the French, Russia, Great Britain and the US during WWI.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is one of the very first “jet fighters” (it was actually rocket powered, but was certainly revolutionary).  This is a German Messerschmidt Me 163B-1a Komet.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Westland Lysander III with it’s innards showing.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is the Morane-Borel monoplane, a French designed/built single engine, single seat monoplane.  It raced in several European air races.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below, with it’s wings folded back, is a Fairey Swordfish II.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here you can see how the wings folded back in order to make more space on the aircraft carrier.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Another pioneer aircraft, the McDowall monoplane, built and designed by Robert McDowall of Ontario.  He finished building the aircraft in 1915.  It is the oldest surviving Canadian built aircraft.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

A side-view of the Fairey Swordfish and some of it’s inner workings.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below – with folded wings – is a Hawker Sea Fury FB.11, a beast of an aircraft.  Once again, the folding wings of these Naval aircraft enabled the crew to not only maneuver the aircraft more easily around/below the flight deck, but it also enabled them to park the aircraft more closely together.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

To round out the trilogy, here is the McDonnell F2H-3 Banshee.  Below, you are able to see the ports for 20mm cannons.  There are two on each side and are positioned so that the muzzle flash does not blind the pilot when fired at night.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

The Sea Fury as seen from the rear of the aircraft.  Can you imagine being in that cockpit, trying to see the runway over the nose of the aircraft?

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

This commercial airliner jet engine on display, made you realize how large these engines really are.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

The tail end of the Avro 683 Lancaster X, with it’s quad .303 machine guns.  (Nash & Thomson FN20)

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

This Hawker Typhoon is a very special aircraft.  It is an MK Ib MN 235 and is the worlds last, fully complete Typhoon.  It is the same type that the City Of Ottawa 440 squadron flew in WWII.  It is on loan (for about 2 years) from the RAF Museum in London and arrived in Ottawa just in time for this year’s D-Day celebrations.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is another example of Germany’s “jet age” combat aircraft, the Heinkel He 162A-1 Volksjager (People’s fighter).  The aircraft was made mostly of wood, as metal was in short supply at the time and was also being kept for other aircraft.  It saw operational service starting in April of 1945, but far to late for the Third Reich.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Messerschmitt BF 109F-4.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is the nose of the Avro Lancaster, with the tail of the He 162 and the side of the BF 109 in the foreground.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Fleet 16B Finch II.  It is a two seat trainer that began service in 1939 and was heavily used in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) during WWII.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a North American Harvard II, another training aircraft used by the British Commonwealth to train it’s pilots during WWII

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

A Hawker Hurricane XII.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Another view of the BF 109F-4.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Now for some helicopters.  Below we have a Boeing Vertol CH-113 Labrador.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Next to the large Labrador, is this very small Bell 47G HTL-6.  This helicopter was employed as an observation/training helicopter.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Sikorsky S-55 H04S-3.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Bell CH-136 Kiowa.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Bell CH-135 Twin Huey.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

And to round things out for the helicopters, here is a Piasecki HUP-3.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Civilians.  Below is a Lockheed L-10A Electra.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Just to the right of the Lockheed is a Boeing 247D.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Douglas DC-3, famous in both the civil and military world of aviation.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Bombardier Challenger 604.  Here, Active Control Technology is on display.  ACT aids the pilot in controlling advanced fly-by-wire aircraft.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Perched up on this display and looking over the museum floor, is a De Havilland D.H.100 Vampire 3.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is the the McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) CF-188 (CF-18B).  These aircraft came into service with the RCAF in 1982 and are still serving till this day.  I won’t get into politics here, but we don’t need the F-35.  It is not a suitable aircraft for the service and missions it would be tasked with.  What would be more suitable, is the Super Hornet or the Eurofighter Typhoon.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a bit of an odd aircraft, the Canadair CL-84-1 Dynavert.  This is a truly Canadian aircraft that was designed & built by Canadair between 1962-72.

Four units were made, with three of them entering flight testing.  Two of them crashed, but there was no loss of life.  Even though the aircraft performed very well in experimental and operational trials, no production models were ever built.

Makes me wonder if this was not the pre-cursor to today’s Boeing V-22 Osprey.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

The Lockheed F-104A Starfighter.  The Germans called it the “widowmaker” and for good reason.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Hawker Siddeley AV-8A Harrier.  Interesting that they have this aircraft on display since it never served with any branch of the Canadian Armed Forces.  Though, it was next to the CL-84, another V-TOL aircraft.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is the Canadair CF-116 (CF-5A).  They were actually built under license from Northrop by Canadair.  The RCAF took possession of their CF-5s starting in 1968 and finally retired them in 1995.  A total of 220 units were made.

CF-5As actually performed reconnaissance missions over Oka during the Oka Crisis in 1990.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

The McDonnell CF-101B Voodoo.  These aircraft were built and sold by McDonnell Aircraft Corporation (now Boeing) of St. Louis.  They replaced the CF-100 Canuck in RCAF service.

The Voodoo served in the RCAF from 1961 to 1984 and served as the primary all-weather interceptor.

I was first acquainted with the Voodoo at an airshow in Mirabel, probably not to long before it was retired.  Let me tell you, it is a beast of an aircraft.  Loud does not begin to describe it.  You can just feel the brute force of the engines as it roars past.

XPRO2943_2448x1632CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is the Avro Canada CF-100 MK.5D.  This is the aircraft that was replaced by the CF-101 Voodoo.   The CF-100 was the only mass produced Canadian fighter jet and had a short takeoff run & high rate of climb, making it perfect for the role of interceptor.  It entered service with the RCAF in 1953 and was retired in 1981.  It also served with the Belgian Air Force.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is the gun pack that was featured in the MK.3 version of the CF-100.  It consisted of eight Browning M3 .50 caliber machine guns.  The pack dropped out for faster service.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Mig 15 – NATO reporting name “Fagot” – (WSK Lim-2) in Polish Air Force livery.  This example is actually a Polish produced Mig 15 under license from Mikoyan Gurevich, the famous Soviet aircraft manufacturer.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

This is the Canadair Sabre 6.   Both the Sabre and the Mig 15 made history over the battlefield of the Korean War, meeting in head-to-head dog fights.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a right side view of the CF-5A.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Angled view of the Sabre 6.  You can clearly see the three gun ports for the .50 caliber M3 Brownings.  The Sabre had a total of six M3 .50 caliber machine guns.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Canadair T-33AN Silver Star 3.  This is another Canadian built jet under license from Lockheed.  It was used as a trainer, communications platform, target towing and enemy aircraft simulator by the RCAF for fifty years.

This particular example, was used as the RCAFs solo aerobatic aircraft, known as the Red Knight.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

This is an underside photo of the nose of the DC-3.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Below is a Noorduyn Norseman VI, a Canadian built & designed bush plane.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a Curtiss HS-2L.  This aircraft was never intended to be a bush plane; but once Canadians got a hold of this flying boat built for the US Navy in WWI, it was employed as one of Canada’s first bush planes after the armistice of WWI was signed.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

Here is a rear side view of an A.E.G. G. IV, a German WWI bomber.

CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM

There you have it.  I was not able to capture every aircraft in the museum due to time constraints, so another trip is in order.

All the photos were taken with the XP1, 35mm and with the Pro Neg Hi film simulation.  With the low light and changing lighting conditions in the museum, i was constantly changing aperture to keep my shutter speed above 1/30.  ISO was on auto, with the ceiling being 6400.

Happy shooting!

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